FISHING FOR THAT NEW CAREER

 

People who know me might say that this article is long overdue.  In my humble opinion, there are many analogies to be made with several areas of life and fishing.  Fishing after all is all encompassing.  This analogy however surfaced while fishing for Snook on a southwest Florida section of the inland waterway but could have just as easily taken place on a Colorado trout river or an Alaska salmon run. A fishing trip and a job search have much in common.

Preparation and anticipation are key ingrediants to achieving success at both fishing and a job search.  You must be excited about the possibilities that lay ahead. Plans must be set for where to work / fish; what your budget is or needs to be; with whom will you work on your search or spend that quality fishing time.  Anticipating what the weather or the corporate culture is will ensure that you have the appropriate clothing and gear to stay warm and dry or be left standing outside the hiring manager’s office wishing you had a tie on like everyone else.  Anticipation of a successful trip or search will keep you both focused and excited even when the fishing is slow or the job search results begin to lag.  After all that next cast or that next networking event may produce the desired result.

Is your equipment ready for action?  Are your waders water tight and your resume updated? Do you have your resume tailored to the particular position for which you are applying and do you have the right fly or bait for the species of fish you are after?  Utilizing the services of a qualified fishing guide or a qualified career coach may enhance your chances for success by getting information on where to go and what to use or say.  These thoughts are being generated form the deck of a well appointed flats fishing boat which is being navigated by an experienced captain and fly-fishing guide.  Without both, success would be marginal at best.

Practicing your technique is critical to a successful presentation.  If the fly doesn’t land just right the fish will surely be spooked. If you haven’t practiced your 30 second drill or your answers to the seven most frequently asked interview questions the interviewing manager may be just as spooked, in either case leaving you empty handed and frustrated.

But let’s say that you have done everything right and have the fish on the line or the job seems to be just perfect for you.  You are feeling satisfied by the constant tugging on the line or have answered every question perfectly but in the very next instant the fish has thrown the hook or there is a better candidate that surfaces for the job…what next?  Check your line for kinks, cinch up your waders, ask your self what you could have done differently and cast that line out again. Another fish and, yes, another job is waiting for you, but you must continue the search with even more resolve than before.  You are learning something with every nibble, and with time, practice, the right conditions and the right equipment success will be yours.

A legal size Snook in the live-well, Brown Trout in the creel, office with a view, job with a future are yours for the taking.  Tight lines and happy job hunting!

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